Kathleen Loves Music

March 8, 2014
The Hanna-Barbera Pic-A-Nic Basket of Cartoon Classics.

fredseibertdotcom:

Click here for my full Hanna-Barbera index.

Hanna-Barbera Pic-a-Nic Box
 

Anyone who knows me is aware of my music habit, and close readers of this blog will pick up on my affection for cartoon music in particular.

So it was extremely gratifying when my friend, Rhino Records…

Songs from The Neverhood.  If you’re a fan of Doug TenNapel’s films or videogames, you’re probably also a huge fan of the fabulous composer Terry Scott Taylor, even if you’re not aware of it. I sure am, and since Frederator Studios was trying to make the movie version of Doug’s famous videogame The Neverhood, I thought I share what a great time I’ve had with Terry’s songs and music from the game, Terry S. Taylor’s Imaginarium: Songs from The Neverhood (on Dreamworks/Stunt Music). You’ll have to buy the two-disc set to get all the songs and demos in full quality (and a whole bonus disc of Skullmonkeys music) and the great liner notes story by Terry. Loving classic cartoon music (and though there’s nothing whatsoever old fashioned about this soundtrack, it’s obvious so do Terry and Doug) I can never get enough of this soundtrack (and remember, this was for a game). Play on shuffle. Have a great day.

March 8, 2014

Songs from The Neverhood

If you’re a fan of Doug TenNapel’s films or videogames, you’re probably also a huge fan of the fabulous composer Terry Scott Taylor, even if you’re not aware of it. I sure am, and since Frederator Studios was trying to make the movie version of Doug’s famous videogame The Neverhood, I thought I share what a great time I’ve had with Terry’s songs and music from the game, Terry S. Taylor’s Imaginarium: Songs from The Neverhood (on Dreamworks/Stunt Music).

You’ll have to buy the two-disc set to get all the songs and demos in full quality (and a whole bonus disc of Skullmonkeys music) and the great liner notes story by Terry. Loving classic cartoon music (and though there’s nothing whatsoever old fashioned about this soundtrack, it’s obvious so do Terry and Doug) I can never get enough of this soundtrack (and remember, this was for a game).

Play on shuffle. Have a great day.

Terry S. Taylor's ImaginariumTerry S. Taylor's Imaginarium

The Dan Danger Show Soundtracks  I was looking through some CDs at my office the other day and ran into these great Ron Jones scores from “The Dan Danger Show” (A Lighter Side of Danger and Danger 101) the Oh Yeah! Cartoons shorts created by Butch Hartman & Steve Marmel in 1999. I’ll do a more comprehensive post on Ron later, but suffice it to say he’s every geek’s dream composer, not only scoring The FOP theme (with Butch), “Star Trek: The Next Generation” but also “Family Guy” and “American Dad.” (Friends of Frederator will remember that Oh Yeah! not only made 51 original character shorts, but certain cartoons [like DD, ChalkZone, The Fairly OddParents, and several others] had a number of sequel shorts.) Cartoon music freaks like me (and Jerry Beck) don’t get a chance to hear too many scores (heck, even feature film scores are rarely released) so I thought I’d let you in on them in their entirety. I can’t help but start laughing when I hear them, and they just remind me what a great show Butch and Steve made. Thanks Ron! …..The Dan Danger Show: Danger 101Created by Butch Hartman & Steve MarmelScore composed by Ron Jones The Dan Danger Show: A Lighter Shade of Danger Created by Butch Hartman & Steve MarmelScore composed by Ron Jones 

March 8, 2014

The Dan Danger Show Soundtracks 
I was looking through some CDs at my office the other day and ran into these great Ron Jones scores from “The Dan Danger Show” (A Lighter Side of Danger and Danger 101) the Oh Yeah! Cartoons shorts created by Butch Hartman & Steve Marmel in 1999. I’ll do a more comprehensive post on Ron later, but suffice it to say he’s every geek’s dream composer, not only scoring The FOP theme (with Butch), “Star Trek: The Next Generation” but also “Family Guy” and “American Dad.”
(Friends of Frederator will remember that Oh Yeah! not only made 51 original character shorts, but certain cartoons [like DD, ChalkZone, The Fairly OddParents, and several others] had a number of sequel shorts.)
Cartoon music freaks like me (and Jerry Beck) don’t get a chance to hear too many scores (heck, even feature film scores are rarely released) so I thought I’d let you in on them in their entirety. I can’t help but start laughing when I hear them, and they just remind me what a great show Butch and Steve made. Thanks Ron!
…..The Dan Danger Show: Danger 101Created by Butch Hartman & Steve MarmelScore composed by Ron Jones

The Dan Danger Show: A Lighter Shade of Danger Created by Butch Hartman & Steve MarmelScore composed by Ron Jones 

The Dan Danger Show Soundtracks 

I was looking through some CDs at my office the other day and ran into these great Ron Jones scores from “The Dan Danger Show” (A Lighter Side of Danger and Danger 101) the Oh Yeah! Cartoons shorts created by Butch Hartman & Steve Marmel in 1999. I’ll do a more comprehensive post on Ron later, but suffice it to say he’s every geek’s dream composer, not only scoring The FOP theme (with Butch), “Star Trek: The Next Generation” but also “Family Guy” and “American Dad.”

(Friends of Frederator will remember that Oh Yeah! not only made 51 original character shorts, but certain cartoons [like DD, ChalkZone, The Fairly OddParents, and several others] had a number of sequel shorts.)

Cartoon music freaks like me (and Jerry Beck) don’t get a chance to hear too many scores (heck, even feature film scores are rarely released) so I thought I’d let you in on them in their entirety. I can’t help but start laughing when I hear them, and they just remind me what a great show Butch and Steve made. Thanks Ron!

…..
The Dan Danger Show: Danger 101
Created by Butch Hartman & Steve Marmel
Score composed by Ron Jones

The Dan Danger Show: A Lighter Shade of Danger
Created by Butch Hartman & Steve Marmel
Score composed by Ron Jones 

Tom and Jerry & Tex Avery Too!: Volume 1, The 1950s Music composed and conducted by Scott BradleyAlbum produced by Lucas Kendall & Daniel Goldmark TCM Turner Classic Movies Music Distributed by Film Score Monthly Manufactured by Rhino Entertainment Company Tom and Jerry & Tex Avery Too! [liner notes] by Fred Seibert ….. Album Produced by Lukas Kendall and Daniel Goldmark  Production Executive for Turner Entertainment Co.: George Feltenstein  Music Score Remix by Michael McDonald, Private Island Trax, Hollywood, California  Digital Mastering by Doug Schwartz, Mulholland Music, North Hollywood, California   Orchestrations by Scott Bradley  Scott Bradley compositions published by EMI Robbins Catalog, Inc. (ASCAP).  CD Art Direction by Joe Sikoryak, designWELL, Berkeley, California  Production Assistance Jeff Eldridge  Still photographs and other poster images courtesy of Turner Entertainment Co.,  A Warner Bros. Entertainment Company.  Additional images courtesy Mike Barrier, Bob Burns, and Photofest.  Special Thanks: Keith Zajic, Mark Pinkus, Dave Kapp, Noni Ellison, Rebecca Bodmer, Nick Corsello, Richard Steele, Bill Rush, Leonard Maltin, Mike Barrier, Keith Scott, Jerry Beck, Mark Kausler, Ned Comstock of the USC Cinema-Television Library, Craig Spaulding, Jonathan K. Kaplan, Alexander Kaplan and Tim Curran.  ….. Note: If the copyright holders to these vintage cartoon soundtracks make them readily available we’ll happily guide fans towards the releases and remove these files.

August 31, 2013

Tom and Jerry & Tex Avery Too!: Volume 1, The 1950s
Music composed and conducted by Scott BradleyAlbum produced by Lucas Kendall & Daniel Goldmark
TCM Turner Classic Movies Music Distributed by Film Score Monthly Manufactured by Rhino Entertainment Company





Tom and Jerry & Tex Avery Too! [liner notes] by Fred Seibert
…..
Album Produced by Lukas Kendall and Daniel Goldmark 
Production Executive for Turner Entertainment Co.: George Feltenstein 

Music Score Remix by Michael McDonald, Private Island Trax, Hollywood, California 
Digital Mastering by Doug Schwartz, Mulholland Music, North Hollywood, California  
Orchestrations by Scott Bradley 
Scott Bradley compositions published by EMI Robbins Catalog, Inc. (ASCAP). 
CD Art Direction by Joe Sikoryak, designWELL, Berkeley, California 
Production Assistance Jeff Eldridge 
Still photographs and other poster images courtesy of Turner Entertainment Co.,  A Warner Bros. Entertainment Company. 
Additional images courtesy Mike Barrier, Bob Burns, and Photofest. 

Special Thanks: Keith Zajic, Mark Pinkus, Dave Kapp, Noni Ellison, Rebecca Bodmer, Nick Corsello, Richard Steele, Bill Rush, Leonard Maltin, Mike Barrier, Keith Scott, Jerry Beck, Mark Kausler, Ned Comstock of the USC Cinema-Television Library, Craig Spaulding, Jonathan K. Kaplan, Alexander Kaplan and Tim Curran. 
…..
Note: If the copyright holders to these vintage cartoon soundtracks make them readily available we’ll happily guide fans towards the releases and remove these files.

Tom and Jerry & Tex Avery Too!: Volume 1, The 1950s

Music composed and conducted by Scott Bradley
Album produced by Lucas Kendall & Daniel Goldmark

TCM Turner Classic Movies Music 
Distributed by Film Score Monthly 
Manufactured by Rhino Entertainment Company

Tom and Jerry & Tex Avery Too! [liner notes] by Fred Seibert

…..

Album Produced by Lukas Kendall and Daniel Goldmark 

Production Executive for Turner Entertainment Co.: George Feltenstein 
Music Score Remix by Michael McDonald, Private Island Trax, Hollywood, California 
Digital Mastering by Doug Schwartz, Mulholland Music, North Hollywood, California  
Orchestrations by Scott Bradley 
Scott Bradley compositions published by EMI Robbins Catalog, Inc. (ASCAP). 
CD Art Direction by Joe Sikoryak, designWELL, Berkeley, California 
Production Assistance Jeff Eldridge 
Still photographs and other poster images courtesy of Turner Entertainment Co.,  A Warner Bros. Entertainment Company. 
Additional images courtesy Mike Barrier, Bob Burns, and Photofest. 
Special Thanks: Keith Zajic, Mark Pinkus, Dave Kapp, Noni Ellison, Rebecca Bodmer, Nick Corsello, Richard Steele, Bill Rush, Leonard Maltin, Mike Barrier, Keith Scott, Jerry Beck, Mark Kausler, Ned Comstock of the USC Cinema-Television Library, Craig Spaulding, Jonathan K. Kaplan, Alexander Kaplan and Tim Curran. 

…..

Note: If the copyright holders to these vintage cartoon soundtracks make them readily available we’ll happily guide fans towards the releases and remove these files.

Hank Jones > ‘Bop Redux

July 21, 2012

Hank Jones > 'Bop Redux

hank jones

Hank Jones
‘Bop Redux

Muse Records MR 5123

Produced by Fred Seibert, in association with Dick Ables
Grammy Nominee, 1977, Best Jazz Instrumental Performance - Soloist

Hank Jones: Piano
George Duvivier: Bass
Ben Riley: Drums

…..
Hank Jones had been an exemplar jazz journeyman when he took a full time day job in the CBS Orchestra in 1952. This record date, the first after his contract finally expired, was arranged by Muse Records’ owner Joe Fields, and he cordially asked me to handle the production. My primary contribution –-I was a wet behind the ears 26 year old with no particular skills–- was suggesting the jazz standards repetoire as a respite from the relentlessness of the “energy” avant-garde of the previous 10 years. I also chose the engineer and studio, asked Hank to avoid bass solos, named the album after John Updike’s ‘Rabbit Redux,’ and got my partner-to-be and great friend Alan Goodman to write the liner notes.

HankGeorge and Ben showed up both day punctually at 10am, in jackets and ties, and played their asses off. The best story? As Hank was working through “Monk’s Mood” he told me he’d learned the piece when Monk asked him to write out the lead sheets, since Monk couldn’t write music.

Fred Seibert
…..
Credits
Muse Records MR 5123
Hank Jones
‘Bop Redux

Hank Jones: Piano, George Duvivier: Bass, Ben Riley: Drums

Produced by Fred Seibert, in association with Dick Ables
Engineered by Chuck Irwin, CI Recording (110 W57th Street, NYC)
January 18 & 19, 1977

Cover Photograph & Design by Carol Friedman
…..
Liner notes:

From the original release:
Few musicians tour and perform more steadily, in so many far-flung places, than pianist Hank Jones. Yet, he may be completely unknown to people who are aware of jazz primarily through radio and records. An issue of Swing Journal pictured albums of solo and trio dates on Verve, another series of recordings from the mid-fifties on Savoy, Capitol, and other labels, and just a small sampling from his resume as a sideman and accompanist. Almost all of the records are unavailable in the USA.

For fifteen years, he was a staff musician with CBS, and many times, parts written especially for Hank Jones would go to a substitute when Hank was needed for the Ed Sullivan or Jackie Gleason shows, a musical special starring Carol Burnett or Barbara Streisand, or one of the many weekly series on network TV and radio.

Since the CBS orchestra was disbanded in 1973, Hank has been choosing for himself some fascinating assignments: he toured with Benny Goodman (which is something he did years ago), made one album with three other pianists, traveled to Japan many times an recorded albums available in that country with variations of his Great Jazz Trio — a group that usually had included Ron Carter and Tony Williams. When he isn’t flying to another engagement he fits in a nightclub appearance.

This was Hank’s first recording for Muse and was something of a departure from his regular approach to recording. He can reach into a stockpile containing thousands of tunes, but instead selected only two composers to help him dig into bebop. When Hank recorded with Charlie Parker, he had been based in New York for six years, playing piano at the Onyx Club and other 52nd Street haunts, working with swing bands and transitional groups, and touring the world with Ella Fitzgerald and with Jazz at the Philharmonic. But even today, bebop is especially suited to a virtuoso’s art. Hank can play chorus after chorus, always finding a new and curious way to say beautiful things. He breaks time with irregularly-spaced hurdles. Even during short bursts, there is something toward which he is working.

Throughout the album, there are special Hank Jones touches you hardly notice: the delicate filigrees that will sometimes separate introduction from the theme, the way he sustains notes uniformly at the end of repeating phrase. Plenty of Hank’s special touches are right out in the open: for one, his deep appreciation for closely-voiced chords. Like Art Tatum, he constantly shifts heavy handfuls of them as easily as some people swing their pockets. After Ellington, he pays strict attention to the flow of melody and the ascension into song. Although their styles of phrasing are miles apart, he and the late Erroll Garner share a talent for certifying selections. Theirs sound like the first authentic versions. For all of his public performing, Hank plays liek a man who is often alone with music. His improvisations on “Yardbird Suite” and “Confirmation” are stories with the important inner details intact. A moderate tempo swing buoys “Bloomdido,” and Hank punctures “Moose the Mooche” with clean, precise darts to let the song’s inherent humor escape. “Relaxin’ With Lee,” based on “Stompin’ at the Savoy” changes, sums the course of the entire session. Hank Jones is not a musician who plays only when the tapes are rolling. When they are, he can relax with a special, casual attention to business.

It is on the three ballads by Thelonius Monk that Hank uses his position as chief soloist and keeper of the chords to particular advantage. His overview of the keyboard and closeness to Monk’s compositions allow him to range generously through the pieces. When Hank thought to record one of them at the session, he remembered as well his own long-term involvement with the tune: back in 1946 or ‘47, Monk phoned him to ask if he would write down a song that had just been composed. The song turned out to be “Monk’s Mood,” one of his rough-hewn gems. Compared to Monk’s version, where every phrase is a jagged chant, Hank takes liberties with the rhythm, hangs onto the passing tones before letting them gently resolve, and in the process strokes the song into something more symphonic.

His partners here, Duvivier and Riley, came to the project with distinguished pedigrees. George Duvivier worked in many orchestras and bands during the forties, performed with Bud Powell on some of Verve recordings, and through the years has appeared with symphonies in New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Cleveland, and with singers all over the world. Another studio veteran, he has played on three TV networks.

Ben Riley sifted through a score of bands from the late fifties, with Nina Simone, Kenny Currell, Randy Weston, Sonny Rollins, and others, before settling in with Monk in the sixties. He has taught in elementary school and junior college on Long Island, in addition to appearing with Ron Carter and recording with the New York Jazz Quartet, Alice Coltrane, Kenny Burrell, and many others.

Hank Jones shows no signs of slowing down his hectic pace, which is as limitless as his beboping abilities. One hopes for more “redux”-ing of the jazz traditions he has known, for many more years of his warming touch and quiet finesse.

Few musicians tour and perform more steadily, in so many far-flung places, than pianist Hank Jones. Yet, he may be completely unknown to people who are aware of jazz primarily through radio and records. An issue of Swing Journal pictured albums of solo and trio dates on Verve, another series of recordings from the mid-fifties on Savoy, Capitol, and other labels, and just a small sampling from his resume as a sideman and accompanist. Almost all of the records are unavailable in the USA.

For fifteen years, he was a staff musician with CBS, and many times, parts written especially for Hank Jones would go to a substitute when Hank was needed for the Ed Sullivan or Jackie Gleason shows, a musical special starring Carol Burnett or Barbara Streisand, or one of the many weekly series on network TV and radio.

Since the CBS orchestra was disbanded in 1973, Hank has been choosing for himself some fascinating assignments: he toured with Benny Goodman (which is something he did years ago), made one album with three other pianists, traveled to Japan many times an recorded albums available in that country with variations of his Great Jazz Trio — a group that usually had included Ron Carter and Tony Williams. When he isn’t flying to another engagement he fits in a nightclub appearance.

This was Hank’s first recording for Muse and was something of a departure from his regular approach to recording. He can reach into a stockpile containing thousands of tunes, but instead selected only two composers to help him dig into bebop. When Hank recorded with Charlie Parker, he had been based in New York for six years, playing piano at the Onyx Club and other 52nd Street haunts, working with swing bands and transitional groups, and touring the world with Ella Fitzgerald and with Jazz at the Philharmonic. But even today, bebop is especially suited to a virtuoso’s art. Hank can play chorus after chorus, always finding a new and curious way to say beautiful things. He breaks time with irregularly-spaced hurdles. Even during short bursts, there is something toward which he is working.

Throughout the album, there are special Hank Jones touches you hardly notice: the delicate filigrees that will sometimes separate introduction from the theme, the way he sustains notes uniformly at the end of repeating phrase. Plenty of Hank’s special touches are right out in the open: for one, his deep appreciation for closely-voiced chords. Like Art Tatum, he constantly shifts heavy handfuls of them as easily as some people swing their pockets. After Ellington, he pays strict attention to the flow of melody and the ascension into song. Although their styles of phrasing are miles apart, he and the late Erroll Garner share a talent for certifying selections. Theirs sound like the first authentic versions. For all of his public performing, Hank plays liek a man who is often alone with music. His improvisations on “Yardbird Suite” and “Confirmation” are stories with the important inner details intact. A moderate tempo swing buoys “Bloomdido,” and Hank punctures “Moose the Mooche” with clean, precise darts to let the song’s inherent humor escape. “Relaxin’ With Lee,” based on “Stompin’ at the Savoy” changes, sums the course of the entire session. Hank Jones is not a musician who plays only when the tapes are rolling. When they are, he can relax with a special, casual attention to business.

It is on the three ballads by Thelonius Monk that Hank uses his position as chief soloist and keeper of the chords to particular advantage. His overview of the keyboard and closeness to Monk’s compositions allow him to range generously through the pieces. When Hank thought to record one of them at the session, he remembered as well his own long-term involvement with the tune: back in 1946 or ‘47, Monk phoned him to ask if he would write down a song that had just been composed. The song turned out to be “Monk’s Mood,” one of his rough-hewn gems. Compared to Monk’s version, where every phrase is a jagged chant, Hank takes liberties with the rhythm, hangs onto the passing tones before letting them gently resolve, and in the process strokes the song into something more symphonic.

His partners here, Duvivier and Riley, came to the project with distinguished pedigrees. George Duvivier worked in many orchestras and bands during the forties, performed with Bud Powell on some of Verve recordings, and through the years has appeared with symphonies in New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Cleveland, and with singers all over the world. Another studio veteran, he has played on three TV networks.

Ben Riley sifted through a score of bands from the late fifties, with Nina Simone, Kenny Currell, Randy Weston, Sonny Rollins, and others, before settling in with Monk in the sixties. He has taught in elementary school and junior college on Long Island, in addition to appearing with Ron Carter and recording with the New York Jazz Quartet, Alice Coltrane, Kenny Burrell, and many others.

Hank Jones shows no signs of slowing down his hectic pace, which is as limitless as his beboping abilities. One hopes for more “redux”-ing of the jazz traditions he has known, for many more years of his warming touch and quiet finesse.

Alan Goodman

…..
From the 1997 reissue:
There are certain artists who are in complete command of their powers. They take the less obvious route, stunning you with nuance, suggestion and subtlety rather than relying on flash. The great English actor Paul Scofield comes to mind, so does the painter Mark Rothko. So, too, does Hank Jones.

Adjectives such as “elegant” and “immaculate” always pop up when Hank’s playing is discussed. Possessed of as much technique as any of the other gians of modern jazz piano, Hank has always dispensed it with restraint. When other pianists cite their favorite players, Hank Jones is always on everyone’s short list.

Because the songs on the two albums contained herein draw on the bebop tradition, they’re especially easy to listen to together. But in reality any two Hank Jones records go well together. Simply stated, he’s one of the ones.

Keep A Light In The Window
Joel Dorn
Spring ‘97
…..
Copyrights and masters owned by their respective owners. I’m posting many of my out-of-print record productions from the 1970s. If any of them are re-released, or the copyright owners object, I’ll delete the posts.

Hank Jones > Groovin’ High

July 21, 2012

Hank Jones > Groovin' High

Groovin High Hank Jones Back

Hank Jones
Groovin’ High

Produced by Fred Seibert

Hank Jones: Piano
Sam Jones: Bass
Mickey Roker: Drums
Thad Jones: Cornet
Charlie Rouse: Tenor Saxophone

As soon as we saw the incredible reaction to our first release with Hank Jones, Bop Redux , in 1977 it was clear to Muse Records’ founder Joe Fields and me we needed to record a sequel. Hank’s absence from the scene for 25 years (in the CBS Orchestra) had only made him better, and the yearning for the emotion and craft of originators of bebop was burning a hole in the hearts of 70s jazz fans. We moved recording from my base at CI Recording in Manhattan (the former Mercury Records studios) to Rudy Van Gelder’s in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, the most famous studio for jazz in the world.

The moment of discord with Hank came when I insisted he replace his choice of drummers (Billy Hart) with a more bop era specific pick (Mickey Roker could take the booking), in keeping with the tunes, and my interest in “authenticity.” (I still think that I was right, though in retrospect, I can’t believe I overrode the ultimate musician, HJ. I would never do it today.)

The moment of discord with the record company came when I casually mentioned Dizzy Gillespie had stopped by to groove on the session (Hank performed two of Dizzy’s tunes on the date).

“Why didn’t you have him play?!” Joe demanded. “He’d double the sales of the album.”

“Dizzy didn’t have a horn, only a Jew’s harp,” I protested.

“So?!!!”

Joe was right. 

Fred Seibert

…..

Credits
Muse Records MR 5169
Hank Jones
Groovin’ High

Hank Jones: Piano, Sam Jones: Bass, Mickey Roker: Drums, Thad Jones: Cornet, Charlie Rouse: Tenor Saxophone

Produced by Fred Seibert
Engineered by Rudy VanGelder, VanGelder Studios, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey
January 25, 1978

Original Release 1979, Cover Photograph by Carol Friedman, Cover Design by Ron Warwell

Muse Records Discography

…..

LINER NOTES

From the original 1979 LP release: 

The title of this album is more than appropriate. Not only does Groovin’ High refer to the track that is the album’s centerpiece; the phrase itself neatly encapsulates the original sass and vigor that surrounded the emergence of bebop. And bebop would seem to be what this album is all about.

For the matter, “groovin’ high” even describes the prevalent attitude of the selections within: tough and tuned-in, vigorous and ariba. There are no ballads (the Afro-Cubanism of Algo Bueno and the unusual samba treatment given Sippin’ at Bells are as close as things get to the vaunted “change of pace”), and though this quintet walks the fine line between hot and cool that was also a bop trademark, solid up-tempo blowing is the order of the date.

Despite all this, an even more appropriate title, albeit an awkward one, would be Bebop Redux Revisited. This is part two of the mission set forth in Hank Jones’ earlier Muse LP, ‘Bop Redux (MR 5123). As pointed out on that album, Jones is so vastly diversified— having been the perfect accompanist on countless jazz dates for 35 years, having worked as a network staff musician, having christened the piano chair in his brother Thad’s big band, having most recently keyed the ensemble in the hit musical Ain’t Misbehavin’ — that pinning down one particular direction for a given recording is never easy. The purpose on ‘Bop Redux was to concentrate on the essence of bebop, which few understand better than Jones, and to jump into that arena with unbridled conviction. Groovin’ Highrepresents an extension of that purpose, incorporating horns to form the pure, streamlined combo that bebop, incidentally, set forth as the model for jazz instrumentation.

Hank Jones brings a little something special to the practice of bebop, a reflection of his earliest influence (Teddy Wilson, Fats Waller) and of his first experiences after arriving in New York in 1944. Bud Powell and Al Haig had captured his ears, but his work wasn’t concentrated only on the new music; most of his first gigs, in fact, found him in swing and swing-bop transitional groups, where the light, graceful touch and crisply defined phrasing he had already developed were put to good use. Unlike many of those with similar backgrounds, though, Hank retained this light lucidity of tone— something that most of the boppers replaced with variations on Powell’s riveting, hammering force. And as Hank has steadily added to his harmonic sophistication and brought his sense of melodic subtlety forward to the realm of high art, he has also further freed his buoyant touch, dispatching his improvisatory messages with a still more clearly focused tone.

A sanguine result of all this is Hank’s unusual facility for clarifying and even defining bop lines that may have started out muddy and then grown more obscure. A fine example occurs on ‘Bop Redux: one of the tracks is Charlie Parker’s epic Confirmation, among the most recorded of bop compositions, the bridge of which everyone from Parker on has slid through with nearly reckless abandon. Yet on hank’s version, for what seems like the first tme, the notes are all there, unslurred, and allowing that part of the song to carry all the more weight for its clarity. (Apparently, Hank Jones has long had this ability, as suggested by stories of how he was occasionally employed as a quick-thinking musical stenographer to jot down others’ new compositions.)

None of which should hide the fact that Hank Jones is a consummate craftsman and a hardly-wanting technician; that he is a superb solo player who nonetheless revels in the accompanist’s role, which he fills more ably than most; that his sense of swing is so firmly embedded in the totality of his music that you mostly notice it in retrospect; or that, like Thad, his solos have an uncommon economy about them, almost always giving the impression they have taken you from point A to point B via a combination of the quickest and most scenic routes. (This last virtue became an ethic for the entire session, you’ll notice; the idea was to keep the solos and the tracks short and cogent, striving for the celebrated should of wit.)

Hank’s country stroll of an introduction is a surprising lead-in for Algo Bueno , which swings from its opening chorus into a typically spirited trio performance, including one of the percussive, big-toned solos that has kept bassist Sam Jones so justifiably in demand. Note especially the little off-center denouement he reaches in his second chorus, followed by a wonderful reversion to walking bass lines to close the solo. Still, it’s hard to imagine this episode going so well without the rawboned telepathy of Mickey Roker, the stunning drummer who has anchored Dizzy Gillespie’s bands for nearly a decade. It’s Roker’s trap-set soft-shoe that does so much to enliven the other trio track, Blue Monk; he practically enforces Hank’s strong, bright tempo and tough solo.

Thad’s mildly startling arrangement of Anthropology stems from his work on a remarkable album by Heiner Stadler (Tribute to Monk and Bird, on Tomato) one week before Groovin’ High was recorded. That borrowed one of the several techniques used by Stadler to reshape a number of bop classics, retaining the melody for himself and assigning to Charlie Rouse the bitonal harmony line. The familiar theme cuts through the rhythm section with an almost ragged-sounding alarm before settling into a string of fine solos. Hank, despite the fund of instantly available music at his mental disposal, uses quotes rather sparingly iin his soloing, but don’t miss the touch of Moose the Mooche before he’s gone ten measures.

Sippin’ at Bells, the oft-ignored Miles Davis line, also benefits from the expert rhythmic control of Roker, popping along under his power and displaying Thad— whose solo abilities have been unjustly overshadowed by his imposing big band charts— in one of his favorite muses.) Miles didn’t write it as a samba, but it works as one.) I mean You, frank and feisty, has no choice but to be a showcase for Rouse’s warm, slightly reserved tenor. Rouse was a member of Monk’s working unit for a decade, and listening to him play a Monk song is a bit like getting a phone call from the legendary Mr. Watson, or having Mrs.Wellington serving the beef: it has the inventor’s touch all over it, by virtue of the tenor man’s total immersion in the Monk weltanshauung. Few understand Monk so well as Rouse— or, for that matter, Thad Jones, who took part in several key 1950s sessions with Monk and who lets fly an especially inspired solo on Monk’s martial plan Jackie-ing.

Best for last: the unexpected instrumentation and wholly successful rendering of the title track. Thad mimics composer Gillespie’s tone and a few of his conceits in the process of building a full-bodied and individualistic solo; Hank’s backing is a solo all its own, and Roker leaves no doubt that he is as comfortable with brush business as with riotous stick-wielding. It was producer Fred Siebert’s idea to try out this trio; Hank was at first reluctant, than cautious, but by the time it was finished he confessed it had worked much better than he’d hoped, reminding him in a way of the Benny Goodman trios of the ’30s. That comment is right in line with a man who has expounded, at times brilliantly, on bebop without losing the gentler sensibilities of an earlier time.

Combining them both, as he has done throughout his career, is what Groovin’ High is really all about. 

- NEIL TESSER

 Produced by Frederick Seibert

Recorded at Van Gelder Recording Studio, Englewood

Cliffs, N.J. — January 25th, 1978

Engineer: Rudy Van Gelder

Cover photo: Carol Friedman

Album design: Ron Warwell

 *does not appear on this album

For free catalog send to MUSE RECORDS, A Division of Blanchris, Inc., 160 West 71st Street, New York, N.Y. 10023

©® 1979, MUSE RECORDS, A DIVISION OF BLANCHRIS, INC.

…..

From the 1997 CD reissue:
There are certain artists who are in complete command of their powers. They take the less obvious route, stunning you with nuance, suggestion and subtlety rather than relying on flash. The great English actor Paul Scofield comes to mind, so does the painter Mark Rothko. So, too, does Hank Jones.

Adjectives such as “elegant” and “immaculate” always pop up when Hank’s playing is discussed. Possessed of as much technique as any of the other gians of modern jazz piano, Hank has always dispensed it with restraint. When other pianists cite their favorite players, Hank Jones is always on everyone’s short list.

Because the songs on the two albums contained herein draw on the bebop tradition, they’re especially easy to listen to together. But in reality any two Hank Jones records go well together. Simply stated, he’s one of the ones.

Keep A Light In The Window
Joel Dorn
Spring ‘97

…..
Copyrights and masters owned by their respective owners. I’m posting many of my out-of-print record productions from the 1970s. If any of them are re-released, or the copyright owners object, I’ll delete the posts.

Oblivion Records for sale. Well, the music at least. Oblivion would like to get some money in the hands of the artists we recorded, and given that the releases have been out of print for several decades that’s been impossible. For several years, Travis Pomposello and I have made available for free download the entire Oblivion Records catalog. Five LPs and a single, plus dozens of bonus tracks. But, I know there are a lot of fans that aren’t comfortable with free, figuring the quality must be sub-standard (not in our case), or that it’s just too much work. Besides, free doesn’t generate any income for the artists. So we’ve figured out a way to generate income without getting into “the record business” again which is way too much work for too little return, for everyone. And more importantly, from this point on, Oblivion will be giving 100% of the earnings to the original artists or their estates. Now the complete Oblivion Records* is available digitally at your favorite location. Amazon, iTunes, eMusic, and most of the other download stores have all the releases. As do MOG, Spotify, Rhapsody, or any subscription service of your choosing.**  Enjoy!  -Fred Seibert ….. *Excepting Honest Tom Pomposello. We don’t have access to the original master tapes, so you’ll have to make do with the free, high quality transfers we’ve made from a clean vinyl LP. ** If you’d like to find out what we’ve learned about this beta year in the digital music biz, just click here.

December 27, 2011

Oblivion Records for sale. Well, the music at least.

Oblivion would like to get some money in the hands of the artists we recorded, and given that the releases have been out of print for several decades that’s been impossible.

For several years, Travis Pomposello and I have made available for free download the entire Oblivion Records catalog. Five LPs and a single, plus dozens of bonus tracks. But, I know there are a lot of fans that aren’t comfortable with free, figuring the quality must be sub-standard (not in our case), or that it’s just too much work. Besides, free doesn’t generate any income for the artists.

So we’ve figured out a way to generate income without getting into “the record business” again which is way too much work for too little return, for everyone. And more importantly, from this point on, Oblivion will be giving 100% of the earnings to the original artists or their estates.

Now the complete Oblivion Records* is available digitally at your favorite location. Amazon, iTunes, eMusic, and most of the other download stores have all the releases. As do MOG, Spotify, Rhapsody, or any subscription service of your choosing.** 

Enjoy! 

-Fred Seibert

…..
*Excepting Honest Tom Pomposello. We don’t have access to the original master tapes, so you’ll have to make do with the free, high quality transfers we’ve made from a clean vinyl LP.

** If you’d like to find out what we’ve learned about this beta year in the digital music biz, just click here.

Gunter Hampel, Jeanne Lee, Perry Robinson > Spirits

December 8, 2009

spirit1

spirit2

Gunter HampelJeanne LeePerry Robinson
Spirits
Birth
 007

Engineered by Fred Seibert
…..
Our regular readers/listeners will probably like this even less than the Cecil Taylor post, but that’s OK with me. It’s my first released recording, and I have a certain nostalgic feeling for Gunter, who helped introduce me to avant-gardefree jazz.

And, unusual as the sonics are, I like them too. The radio booth we recorded in was less than 20′x30′, low ceilings, only a little baffling on the walls. The tape machine was anAmpex two track, and the board only had hard left, right, and center inputs, no echo. The mikes were classic RCA ribbons. Somehow, with this music, it all sounds right. To me.

…..
Click on the titles below for MP3 transfers from a vinyl LP.

…..
From the LP jacket:

Birth stereo 007
The Music of Gunter Hampel

JEANNE LEE voice
GUNTER HAMPEL piano, flute, vibrafon, bassclarinet
PERRY ROBINSON clarinet

Photos by (JL) Wilfried Bauer, (GH) Billy Maynard, (PR) Jeanette Hamblin

SPIRITS are excerpts from a live-radio-performance at the WKCR Columbia University Radio Station in New York, August 26, 1971, the program was engineered by FRED SEIBERT

MAILORDER
we record the music in the best studios, but without commercial producers. we have no distribution. you will not find our records at your record dealer! we sell by mailorder and send to the u.s.a., canada, belgium southamerica, england, sweden, danmark, the netherlands, france, austria, switzerland, africa, india, japan, and others.

each album 30 cm stereo $6 inclusiv mail, please send sheque to 34 Gottingen, Philipp-Reis-Str. 10 West Germany
USA: 1370 Prospect Ave, Bronx 59 NEW YORK CITY.

also contact addresses for performances!

…..
Copyrights and masters are owned by their respective owners. I’m posting many of my out-of-print record productions from the 1970s. If any of them are re-released, or the copyright owners object, I’ll delete the posts.

As I was routing around our blogs I noticed we’d had a few substantial mentions of early cartoon composer Sammy Timberg by Dave Kirwan and Anne D. Bernstein. It’s pretty hard to find his family’s excellent 2004 CD recreations from his original arrangements for songs from Fleischer Studios’ Betty Boop, Superman, Popeye and others. So, I’m posting {lower resolution than perfect} files of the CD until it becomes readily available again. Like a lot of you, I love cartoon music from back in the day, so enjoy. –Fred …..Pat Timberg presentsBoop-Oop-A-Dooin’The Songs of Sammy Timberg ….. The complete CD booklet: Boop-Oop-A-Dooin’: The Songs of Sammy Timberg …..Copyrights and masters of these out of print recordings are by their respective owners. If this recording is re-released, or the copyright holders object, I’ll delete the posts.

October 31, 2009

As I was routing around our blogs I noticed we’d had a few substantial mentions of early cartoon composer Sammy Timberg by Dave Kirwan and Anne D. Bernstein. It’s pretty hard to find his family’s excellent 2004 CD recreations from his original arrangements for songs from Fleischer Studios’ Betty Boop, Superman, Popeye and others. So, I’m posting {lower resolution than perfect} files of the CD until it becomes readily available again. Like a lot of you, I love cartoon music from back in the day, so enjoy. –Fred
…..Pat Timberg presentsBoop-Oop-A-Dooin’The Songs of Sammy Timberg

…..
The complete CD booklet: Boop-Oop-A-Dooin’: The Songs of Sammy Timberg

…..Copyrights and masters of these out of print recordings are by their respective owners. If this recording is re-released, or the copyright holders object, I’ll delete the posts.

As I was routing around our blogs I noticed we’d had a few substantial mentions of early cartoon composer Sammy Timberg by Dave Kirwan and Anne D. Bernstein. It’s pretty hard to find his family’s excellent 2004 CD recreations from his original arrangements for songs from Fleischer Studios’ Betty Boop, Superman, Popeye and others. So, I’m posting {lower resolution than perfect} files of the CD until it becomes readily available again. Like a lot of you, I love cartoon music from back in the day, so enjoy. –Fred

…..
Pat Timberg presents
Boop-Oop-A-Dooin’
The Songs of Sammy Timberg

…..

The complete CD booklet: Boop-Oop-A-Dooin’: The Songs of Sammy Timberg

…..
Copyrights and masters of these out of print recordings are by their respective owners. If this recording is re-released, or the copyright holders object, I’ll delete the posts.

Richard Davis > Harvest

October 31, 2009

Richard Davis-Harvest
Richard Davis-Harvest back

Richard Davis
Harvest
Muse Records  MR 5115

Produced by Frederick Seibert
Co-produced & arranged by Bill Lee

……
‘Producing’ the jazz I was involved with was mostly a misnomer, it was actually ‘recording supervision.’ I mean, what was an a rock’n’roll playing, 26 year old kid from the suburbs going to tell a master musician to do? Play faster? Better? The records weren’t always what I would’ve wanted, but they reflected the vision of the artist. That was my job.

…..
SIDE A
Forest Flower

This Masquerade

Half Pass 

Three Flowers

SIDE B
Windflower

Passion Flower

A Third Away

Take the A Train

Forest Flower (reprise)

……
Richard Davis: bass
Bill Lee: bass
Marvin Hannibal Peterson: trumpet
Ted Dunbar: guitar
Consuela Moore: piano
Freddie Waits: drums
James Spaulding: alto saxophone, flute

Recorded at CI Recording
110 West 57th Street
New York City
May 3 & 16, 1977

Engineer: Elvin Campbell
Cover photo: Pat Davis
Cover design: Ron Warwell

…..
Copyrights and masters owned by their respective owners. I’m posting many of my out-of-print record productions from the 1970s. If any of them are re-released, or the copyright owners object, I’ll delete the posts.